Back

Services

Orthodontics




Back

Dental Veneers

Veneers are a thin, semi-transparent tooth shaped "shell" that are custom made of porcelain. They are permanently bonded to your natural teeth which are located in your "smile zone" to enhance their shape, color, length or size. Veneers can fix gaps between teeth and/or improve the appearance of teeth that are discolored, misshaped or misaligned.

Procedure:
1) The teeth are cleaned and any old surface restorations are removed.
2) An impression is taken of the prepped tooth and sent to a lab where a veneer is fabricated.
3) The veneer is applied with bonding resin and curing light.
4) After the veneer is set, it is shaped and polished to look like a natural tooth.




Back

Crown Procedure

To place a crown, your dentist must reduce 1-2 mm of the tooth to make room for it. Your dentist will then use a piece of thread or cord or use a laser to push the gum down around the tooth, to take an impression of the tooth. The impressions are sent to the lab where the crown is made. During that time, you will have a temporary crown. These crowns are usually made of plastic and are made in your dentist's office on the day of your visit. They are not meant to last. If a temporary crown is left in the mouth, the cement eventually washes out, and the tooth can decay.


At a second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and test the permanent one. Sometimes crowns need additional polishing, or glaze or some other adjustment before they are placed. Once the crown is ready, it's cemented to your tooth.




Back

Teeth Whitening

Tooth whitening is the number one requested and performed cosmetic dental procedure. Tooth whitening is a procedure that lightens teeth and helps to remove stains and discoloration. A thin coating forms on your teeth, throughout the day, which attracts stains. The tooth's enamel contains pores that hold stains.

Cavities need to be treated before teeth are whitened because the whitening solution can penetrate decay and reach inner areas of the tooth, which can cause sensitivity. Receding gums can cause roots to become exposed. Whitening will not work on exposed tooth roots, because roots do not have an enamel layer. Whitening also does not work on tooth restorations such as crowns or veneers.

Whitening can be done in the dental office or at home.




Back

Fixed Bridge

A bridge may be used to replace a single tooth. A bridge consists of both a false tooth, called a pontic and the anchors (abutment crowns) that support the pontic. The entire structure spans the space vacated by the missing tooth.


Neighboring tooth structure is removed, shaping them to receive an anchor crown. An impression is then taken and sent to a dental lab where they fabricate the bridge.


The structure part of the bridge is created with a strong metal alloy that can handle the anticipated stresses.


Tooth-like porcelain is then fused to the structure. Once the bridge is tested for a correct fit, the anchor crowns are cemented to the neighboring teeth.




Back

Single Visit Whitening

One hour bleaching systems use a very bright light to activate higher bleaching concentrations to produce faster, more dramatic whitening results.

The technician will protect your mouth very carefully using cotton rolls, gauze and a liquid dam. A special whitening lamp is used to activate the whitening gel for approximately 60 minutes.




Back

Oral Exam

New patients receive a comprehensive examination which includes a screening for oral cancer, gum and bone disease, blood pressure, and systemic disorders. A routine oral exam is performed on established patients to determine any changes in dental and health status since the previous visit. Your gum tissue is measured with a fine instrument ruler to calibrate, in millimeters, pocket depth between the tooth and the connective gum tissue around the tooth. Pocket depth more than 4 mm could indicate disease and infection. The deeper the pocket, the greater the extent plaque bacteria collects and infection in gum disease develop.

X-rays are taken as needed. Tooth scaling and root planing occur as needed. Routine cleanings also include a professional polishing PROFY that removes only the soft sticky plaque that is above the gum line.




Back

Professional Cleaning

Professional Cleaning

Professional cleaning by the dentist or hygienist is designed to preserve health and prevent the spread of disease. The cleaning involves scaling, planing, and polishing to remove plaque, calculus, and stain deposits. The purpose of polishing tooth surfaces is to make them smooth so that it is more difficult for plaque and debris to accumulate on your teeth and cause decay or gum disease.

The best ways to prevent dental problems are to brush and floss regularly and have routine dental cleanings and exams.




Back

Replacing Old Fillings

There is now new technology that allows you to replace old silver and gold fillings with a more natural looking, composite filling. Composite fillings are bonded to the tooth and research has proven them to be about 90% as strong and healthy as natural tooth material.


Other Benefits:
- Beautiful in appearance
- Completed in a single visit
- No filling leaks
- Less chance of tooth cracking




Back

Brushing

Step 1- Place bristles along the gum line at a 45 degree angle. Gently brush using a circular motion along the outer and inner tooth surfaces.

Step 2 - Brush each tooth individually! Tilt brush vertically behind the front teeth. Using the front half of the brush use the same circular motion.

Step 3 - Place the brush against the biting surface of the teeth and use a gentle back and forth motion. Brush the tongue to remove odor producing bacteria, or use a tongue scraper.




Back

Flossing

Break off about 18 inches of floss and wind some of it around your middle finger (3 turns). This finger will take up the floss as it becomes dirty. Shorten the length between the two fingers to 6 inches and wind some floss (1 turn) around the opposite middle finger. Hold the floss tightly between your thumbs and index fingers.

Guide the floss between your teeth using a gentle rubbing motion. When the floss reaches the gum line, curve it into a C shape against one tooth. Gently slide it into the space between the gum and the tooth. Hold the floss tightly against the tooth as you gently rub the side of the tooth with an up and down motion. Before retrieving it, clean the adjacent tooth surface.

As you finish cleaning each contact wind the dirty floss once around the first middle finger and slide more new length of floss to proceed to the next contact.




Back

Invisalign

Dr. Pham, an Invisalign dentist in Las Vegas, often recommends an Invisalign procedure rather than traditional braces. Invisalign is the breakthrough technology that lets you have the smile you've always wanted without the hassle of braces. By using a series of clear, removable aligners, Invisalign straightens your teeth with results you'll notice sooner than you think. The course of treatment involves changing aligners approximately every two weeks, moving your teeth into straighter position step-by-step, until you have a more beautiful smile. And unlike conventional braces, these clear aligners can be removed while you eat and brush your teeth as usual. An average Invisalign course of treatment takes about a year.

The Invisalign Advantage Over Braces
When choosing an option for straitening your teeth, it's important to consider what works best for not only your appearance, but your lifestyle as well.
  INVISALIGN BRACES
Effectively treats a wide variety of cases, including crowding, spacing, crossbite, overbite and underbite. X X
Straightens your teeth X X
Average cost is about $5,000* X X
Allows you to eat whatever foods you enjoy X  
Lets you remove the device when you want X  
Lets you enjoy virtually invisible teeth-straightening X  
Allows you to brush and floss your teeth normally for better periodontal health X  
Consists of smooth, comfortable plastic instead of sharp metal that is more likely to irritate your cheeks and gums X  
Frees up your busy schedule, with office visits only every four to six weeks X  
Invisalign Teen: Provides up to six free replacement aligners if lost or broken.** X  

* November 2010 Invisalign Patient Survey

** Invisalign Teen Only


Invisalign Website
Invisalign Self Assessment




Back

What Is A Dental Implant?

An implant is a titanium "root" which can be placed into the jawbone. Once integrated with your bone, the implant can be used to support a crown, a bridge, or secure a complete denture. Dental implants may be used to eliminate partial plates and dentures. The success rates for dental implants are extremely high which is due in part to the fact that root-form implants are made of a biocompatible material, titanium. Dental implant treatment represents a slightly greater investment than conventional treatment; however, the benefits of implant therapy for most patients outweigh the minor additional cost involved

Dental Implant FAQ

What is a Dental Implant?

Implants are a tooth replacement option that involves placing a new "root" into the bone of your jaw. Once this titanium "root" has infused with your bone it can be used to support a crown, bridge, or denture. These implants can also be used to replace partials and other forms of dentures. the success rates for dental implants are extremely high. This is due in part to the fact that root-form implants are made of a biocompatible material, titanium. Because titanium is accepted so well by the human body, it is also used for orthopedic implants, such as hip and knee replacements. Dental Implants have now become the standard for replacing older dentistry and missing teeth because they look and feel like your natural teeth and have a higher success rate than all other forms of tooth replacement. The initial cost is generally higher for an implant over other forms of tooth replacement, but the long term benefits easily outweigh the difference in additional cost. An investment in implant dentistry is an investment in overall health, appearance and well being, as it involves preserving the integrity of facial structures, as well as replacing missing teeth. back to index

Why are Dental Implants the best option?

Dental implants can last a lifetime, unlike bridges, partials and dentures that may need to be replaced several times. Unlike bridges, partials and dentures, a dental implant replaces the lost tooth root, which will prevent jaw bone resorption that occurs with bridges, partials and dentures. The loss of tooth roots will cause a change of the smile and contours of the face over time. A bridge, once the common single tooth replacement method, requires the alteration of each neighboring healthy tooth, which is cut down and shaped to accept a crown. With a dental implant treatment, there is no compromise to adjacent teeth. The lost root and crown is replaced leaving neighboring healthy teeth in place. Removable partials connect to healthy teeth by hooks. Partials may be removed for cleaning and may need to be replaced often. A partial hook connected to healthy teeth will create tooth stress and will loosen the healthy teeth over time. Full arch dentures and partials have the added disadvantage of accelerating the bone resorption process, which, among other things, causes the appearance of premature aging. back to index

How will my teeth look and feel?

A single tooth supported by an implant is like turning back the clock of time. The implant replaces the natural tooth root so the jaw bone and supportive gum tissue is as vibrant as ever. Multiple single implants may support single teeth or an implant supported bridge. Dental implants may also support the base for full arch dentures to attach to which provides the look, feel and function of natural teeth. Dental implant treatments is the only tooth replacement solution that prevents jaw bone resorption, which can cause your smile to look unnatural and in some cases, change your facial appearance. The long term esthetics of dental implants are superior to any other treatment option. back to index

Am I a candidate for Dental Implant treatment?

If you are missing one or more teeth and in general good health you are a candidate for dental implant treatment. There are a few qualifying factors that need to be addressed:

  1. Quality and quantity of available bone for implant placement.
  2. Uncontrollable diabetes or other medical conditions.

Overall, there are very few conditions that would keep someone from having implant treatment. Even people who have lost a significant amount of bone can qualify for dental implant treatment; although, an additional procedure(s) to add bone or to create new bone may be necessary. Advances in this type of treatment have made it possible for most people who would not previously have been considered candidates to have successful implant treatment. back to index

Is my age a factor for Dental Implant treatment?

Providing your overall health is good there is really no age restriction. The desire to improve your quality of life is frankly a more important consideration than age. It is not unusual for people with dentures to upgrade to implant supported dentures. It provides a renewed self-confidence in their smile and speech and also provides renewed chewing stability, plus brings back foods into their life that were once off limit.back to index

How long will it take to complete treatment?

Traditional treatment may take anywhere from several weeks to several months, depending upon the quality of the bone in which the implants are placed. If an additional procedure is required in order to augment the bone, the total treatment time may be between six to nine months. Some implant candidates may qualify for Immediate Load / Immediate Function procedures, also known as "same day implants". back to index

Is a dental implant procedure painful?

Most implant patients report that the discomfort is far less than they expected, and is no more remarkable that having a root canal or like having a tooth extracted. Of course you are anesthetized during the procedure, and although everyone's pain tolerance is different, most patients are very comfortable simply taking over-the-counter analgesics afterward. back to index

How long do Dental Implants last?

Dental implants are designed to be permanent; however, there are a few factors that may contribute to the long term success of dental implant treatment, such as the original quality of the surgical and restorative treatment, proper home care and regular check-up visits to your dentist or dental specialist. Dental implant treatment is one of the most successful procedures in the medical-dental field, with documented success rates over 95%. Dental implants have been around for over 30 years and have closely documented clinical research that demonstrates that dental implants will be successful throughout the lifetime of a patient. By comparison, research also demonstrates that the average tooth supported bridge (conventional dentistry) lasts from 7-10 years and that partials and dentures are functional for approximately 5 years before having to replace the appliance.back to index

Can a dental implant work with existing dentures?

Every patient's situation is unique; however, from time-to-time we can use an existing denture by altering the denture to accommodate the necessary denture attachments to fit the implants.

What is the difference between a traditional crown and bridge and an implant supported crown and bridge?

There are several differences.

  1. A dental implant preserves jaw bone.
  2. We do not have to destroy neighboring health teeth by grinding down the teeth to pegs in order to accept a crown.
  3. Implants last longer than traditional crown and bridge. Implants are designed to last a lifetime, while a traditional crown and bridge is projected to last approximately 10 years and may need to be replaced.

Although dental implants have become the standard of care, they are more expensive than old tooth replacement methods. They are a better choice for the money; however, some dentists still recommend the traditional tooth supported bridges for patients due to their own comfort level, or when patients insist on having the immediate lowest possible fee for tooth replacement. Most dentists today detest the idea of grinding down perfectly healthy teeth to place a traditional bridge, and therefore, will almost always recommend dental implant treatment in these cases.

When should a tooth be extracted and replaced with a Dental Implant?

There are times when it makes sense to extract a tooth and replace it with a dental implant.

  1. If a natural tooth is failing or about to fail.
  2. If a tooth has severe periodontal disease (gum disease) that has eroded the bone that supports the teeth. Sometimes in these cases, it is preferable to extract the teeth; eliminate the disease and infection and replace the teeth with a dental implant.
  3. When a tooth has had a root canal (nerves have been removed from the tooth) leaving the tooth brittle and susceptible to fracture. Teeth with severe fractures are usually extracted and are ideal candidates for replacement with dental implant treatment.

Do dental implants require special care?

Home care for a dental implant single tooth or for a dental implant crown and bridge is cleaned like a natural tooth, with regular brushing, flossing and regularly schedule hygiene appointments as directed by your dentist. Home care is a little more complicated for people who are missing all of their teeth, in that special brushes and floss are often recommended. Permanently fixed implant supported replacement teeth are cleaned like all other bridges. If a surgical specialists who placed the implant(s) is involved, they may want to see you at least once each year in addition to your regular dentist. These visits, combined with proper home care, are essential to the long term success of implant treatment.back to index

What is the cost of Dental Implant Treatment?

The actual cost of dental implant treatment is based on a number of factors, such as the number of missing teeth being replaced, the type of implant supported teeth (treatment option) recommended and whether additional procedures are necessary to achieve the proper esthetic and functional result. The only way to accurately estimate the cost for an individual patient is to have an examination and consultation with your dental specialist. The total fee is usually comparable to other methods of tooth replacement; however, long-term, implant treatment is generally more cost effective than other options, such as bridges, partials and dentures that need to be replaced every 5-10 years. back to index

Is Dental Implant treatment covered by my insurance?

Dental insurance coverage of implant treatment depends on your individual policy. Dental benefits are determined by the amount an employer is willing to spend on the policy. Generally, dental policies cover basic routine preventive maintenance, basic care and emergencies. Most insurance plans only cover the basics with an annual maximum allowable benefit of $1,000-$1,500. Most insurance plans do not include dental implant coverage; however, often they will pay the same benefit they would cover for the lowest cost alternative treatment option (partials and dentures) and some of the diagnostic records, if a specific request is made for alternative benefits. You should review your dental insurance plan and your medical insurance plan to see the coverages. Medical coverage is very rare and Medicare does not cover implant treatment. All in all, it is best to assume that there is no medical insurance coverage available.back to index




Back

Implant Placement

In order to place an implant, a couple of steps must be taken:

1) An incision is made into the gums using very precise measurements, then using a very small drill, the jawbone is given a "tap" that will allow the implant to be placed. After the implant is screwed into place, the gums are closed up and the healing process begins. This process can take approximately three to six months to ensure the implant has fused with the bone and created a sturdy base for the new teeth.

2) When the implant is ready, an abutment is attached to the implant, which allows for a new crown to be placed or a denture to be attached.




Back

Single Tooth Dental Implant

Do you have missing teeth? It is critically important to replace missing teeth. Eating and chewing with missing teeth can sabotage your bite and lead to incessant discomfort. Missing teeth can give rise to a mouth rearrangement that often results in facial changes that look decrepit.

A single tooth implant procedure may be done if a tooth has been extracted or is missing. A titanium implant base is placed into the jawbone to resemble the tooth root. We allow a period of time for the jawbone to heal over the implant base before fitting for a crown.


Next, an abutment is screwed into the base of the implant to allow for a crown to be fitted on top. Finally, a custom fabricated crown is placed over the abutment to function like a real tooth.




Back

Multiple Tooth Implants

Multiple tooth implants may be placed if you need or desire to permanently replace an extracted or lost tooth. Titanium implant bases are placed into the jawbone to replace the job of the tooth roots. We allow a period of time to allow for the jawbone to heal over the bases before fitting for a crown. Next, abutments are screwed into the bases of the implants to allow crowns to be attached. Finally, custom fabricated crowns are placed over the abutments and will function like a real tooth.




Back

Full Arch Implants

Dental implants that can be placed to accept a full arch of teeth. The arch is removable yet functions like a full set of normal teeth.




Back

Mini Implants

MDI mini implants were developed in order to provide greater denture stability for those patients who:
1) cannot withstand the rigors of conventional dental implant surgery,
2) do not have enough bone to allow full-size implants to be placed, or
3) are in on-going therapy from one prosthetic system to another.


The head of the MDI mini implants is shaped like a ball, and the retaining fixture acts like a socket that contains a rubber O-ring. The O-ring snaps over the ball when the denture is seated and holds the denture at a predetermined level of force.


Mini-implants can generally be placed start to finish in one to two visits. There is no waiting time for the bone to heal. In many cases mini implants are placed and the patient walks out with their dentures secured on the same day.




Back

Partial Dentures

Removable partial dentures are composed of a metal framework with plastic teeth and gum areas. The framework includes metal clasps or other attachments, which hold the denture in place. Partial dentures are removed easily for cleaning.

Clasps are C-shaped, I-shaped, and Y-shaped parts of the denture framework that fit around neighboring natural teeth. These teeth may require shaping to help hold the clasps and keep the denture securely in place.




Back

Full Arch Dentures

A full arch denture is a removable tooth replacement option for those who need all their teeth replaced. They can be crafted to provide the characteristics (tooth shape and color) the patient desires. Advances have been made in the materials used for dentures and in the way they are designed. If you already have dentures (partial or full arch) you may be experiencing a loose fit or denture slipping. This can lead to gum sores, can affect your chewing and your speech, and decrease your confidence when speaking and/or laughing with others. We can help restore your dentures to the correct fit.




Back

Mini Implants

MDI mini implants were developed in order to provide greater denture stability for those patients who:
1) cannot withstand the rigors of conventional dental implant surgery,
2) do not have enough bone to allow full-size implants to be placed, or
3) are in on-going therapy from one prosthetic system to another.


The head of the MDI mini implants is shaped like a ball, and the retaining fixture acts like a socket that contains a rubber O-ring. The O-ring snaps over the ball when the denture is seated and holds the denture at a predetermined level of force.


Mini-implants can generally be placed start to finish in one to two visits. There is no waiting time for the bone to heal. In many cases mini implants are placed and the patient walks out with their dentures secured on the same day.




Back

Immediate Dentures

An immediate denture is a complete denture or partial denture inserted on the same day, immediately following the removal of natural teeth. Constructing immediate dentures involves taking impressions of your mouth before the teeth are removed. When your remaining teeth are removed the denture can be inserted immediately over the new extraction sites.

The mouth will change after it heals, therefore, your dentures will need to be evaluated at intervals and relined to fit the changes that have occurred in your mouth.




Back

Cu-Sil Dentures

Cu-Sil Dentures

Even a single healthy tooth left in place can add to the stability of the denture by a significant degree. The Cusil denture has holes for natural teeth to come through. These holes are surrounded by silicone rubber which hugs the natural teeth and allows the rest of the denture to rest on the gums. Cusil dentures thus help stabilize loose teeth and extend the life of the teeth.




Back

Root Canal

An abscess infection by tooth decay requires a root canal.

1) An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
2) The pulp is removed, and the root canals are cleaned, enlarged and shaped.
3) The infected area is medicated.
4) The root canals are filled.
5) The crown opening is filled with a temporary.




Back

Post and Crown

If there is not enough tooth structure left for retention after your root canal procedure to support a crown, a post will be placed upon the tooth root. Then a crown buildup will be made and placed around the post. Now a crown will be placed on the buildup.




Back

Apicoectomy

Sometimes the infection persists even after root canal therapy. In these cases, an apicoectomy, or root end resection can be performed to remove diseased tissue.

1) An incision is made to allow access to the base of the tooth. The inflamed or infected pulp is treated and the canals are carefully cleaned and shaped.
2) A small filling may be placed in the remaining tip of the tooth to seal the root canal. The gum tissue is stitched back into place.
3) A crown is placed to protect the tooth.




Back

Periodontal Health Affects

Studies have shown links between periodontal (gum) disease, heart disease and other health conditions. Research further suggests that gum disease may be a more serious risk factor for heart disease than hypertension, smoking, cholesterol, gender and ages.

Researchers conclusions suggest that bacteria present in infected gums can become loose and move throughout the body through the bloodstream. Once bacteria reach the arteries, they can irritate them in the same way that they irritate gum tissue causing arterial plaque, which can cause hardening and affect blood-flow.




Back

Tooth Scaling

Tooth scaling removes plaque, tartar and hard crusty calculus deposits, which are loaded with bacteria.


Sub-gingival tooth scaling is necessary when plaque and tartar are detected below the gum line.




Back

Root Planing

After scaling the tooth roots may need to be planed to smooth the root surface. Soft tissue will re-attach itself to a smooth tooth surface. Your dentist may also recommend medications to help control infection, pain, or to encourage healing.




Back

Gum Lift

A gum lift may be performed to create a more even gum line. Patients with a gummy smile can quickly and safely have unwanted tissue removed, thus exposing more tooth to shape a more attractive smile.




Back

Soft Tissue Grafting

Soft Tissue Grafting

Root exposure resulting from gingival tissue recession may pose multiple problems for patients:

  • Undesirable aesthetics
  • Root sensitivity
  • Impaired oral hygiene
  • Increased caries susceptibility
  • Teeth may become loose


  • A gingival tissue graft will restore the proper gum tissue structure around the tooth.




    Back

    Canine Exposure

    Canine Exposure

    Canines are the longest and most stable teeth in the mouth. Sometimes the tips of the roots of canine teeth need to be exposed before the initiation of orthodontic therapy for older pediatric patients.




    Back

    Crown Lengthening

    Crown lengthening is a surgical procedure that re-contours the gum tissue and often the underlying bone of a tooth. Crown lengthening is often for a tooth to be fitted with a crown. It provides necessary space between the supporting bone and crown, which prevents the new crown from damaging bone and gum tissue.




    Back

    Children Tooth Development

    From the age 6 to 12 a child will be losing baby teeth and getting their permanent adult teeth. There are times when permanent teeth are "stuck" in the bone and gum. However, it is possible to lift back the gum and remove a small amount of bone, allowing these teeth to erupt into the mouth. By the time a child reaches age 21 years all 32 permanent teeth will usually have erupted.




    Back

    Child's First Dental Visit

    Child

    We explain to the child what is going to happen and generally provide a fun interesting experience for the child. We carefully examine the development of their mouth including crowding, appearance of calcium deposits, abnormality in the number of teeth, baby bottle tooth decay, gum disease, TMJ, and signs of prolonged problems such as thumb-sucking and teething. We take x-rays when needed. We clean and polish teeth and apply fluoride when needed. We explain how a healthy diet relates to healthy teeth and we demonstrate the correct way to brush the teeth.




    Back

    Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

    Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

    Baby bottle tooth decay or syndrome is a form of tooth decay that can destroy the teeth of an infant. This decay may even enter the underlying bone structure, which can hamper development of the permanent teeth. The teeth most likely to be damaged are the upper teeth. Baby bottle decay is caused by frequent and long exposure of a child's teeth to liquids containing sugar such as milk, formula, fruit juices, pop and other sweetened liquids. These liquids fuel the bacteria in a child's mouth, which produces acids that attack enamel.




    Back

    Sealants

    Sealants

    Sealants are a proven way to help prevent cavities. Although sealants do not take the place of proper oral hygiene, they do prevent bacteria from getting into the deeper crevices in a tooth's biting surface and therefore keeping the tooth cavity-free.




    Back

    Palate Expander

    Palate Expander

    A palatal expander is an appliance placed in the roof of the mouth to widen the upper dental arch, which allows the arch to be painlessly separated and spread. A treatment used for younger patients. Many times a palatal expander can be used to create a proper alignment of the arches so permanent teeth have room to erupt in a natural position. Often, the use of an arch expander early may eliminate the need for braces later.




    Back

    Space Maintainer

    Space Maintainer

    A space maintainer is a removable or fixed appliance designed to maintain an existing space. They are usually fitted to children when they have lost baby teeth early. The gap left from losing this tooth needs to be held open for the permanent tooth to erupt in its correct position.




    Back

    Pulpotomy

    Pulpotomy

    Pulpotomy is a dental procedure in which dental pulp is removed from the pulp chamber. This is usually done on children's teeth by a pediatric dentist.




    Back

    Stainless Steel Crowns

    Stainless Steel Crowns

    An all metal crown requires less tooth removal to form the crown base. A metal crown is the strongest of the crown types and may be the best alternative to withstand the strong forces of chewing. Molars and other posterior teeth may need a metal based crown or an all metal crown.




    Back

    Pregnancy

    Pregnancy

    We ask that our female patients who are pregnant or think they possibly could be to inform us prior to your x-ray examination and dental treatment.




    Back

    Tobacco

    You are probably familiar with the links between tobacco use and lung disease, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    Current studies have also established that tobacco smoking not only causes direct damage to your mouth but also makes periodontal diseases more damaging and harder to treat.

    There is a greater incidence of calculus formation on teeth, deeper pockets between gums and teeth, more gum recession and more loss of the bone that hold teeth in your mouth. In addition, smokeless tobacco greatly increases your chance of developing oral cancer. Any tobacco usage can complicate the placement of dental implants.

    Besides smokeless tobacco, cigarette smoking negatively impacts the health of the gums. The healing capacity of the mouth is significantly altered. The healing time from any procedure is always increased. Needless to say smoking creates more tartar, more stain, bad breath and an increased potential for mouth cancer.

    Other chemicals impair the function of your white blood cells which are your first line of defense against infection. The tars contain carcinogens which over time induce cell mutations and cancers.

    Quitting tobacco use will lower the risk of your developing cancer and improve the health of your teeth and gums, as well as your heart and lungs.

    Smokeless tobacco poses very serious problems including:
    - Causes tooth decay
    - Eats away your gums
    - Leads to tooth loss
    - Bad breath
    - Stains your teeth
    - Causes oral sensitivity to hot and cold
    - Decreases sense of taste and smell

    If oral cancer is left untreated long enough, it may even cause death.




    Back

    Oral Piercing

    Oral Piercing

    Oral piercing can cause serious dental problems. Oral jewelry may cause problems such as:

  • Chip or break your teeth and/or fillings
  • Erode your gums
  • Damage a tooth's inner pulp (resulting in a root canal to correct the problem)
  • Interferes with x-rays and diagnosis
  • Causes drooling problems
  • Causes speech impairment
  • And can cause permanent numbness in your tongue



  • Back

    Bruxism

    Bruxism, commonly known as 'tooth grinding,' is the process of clenching together and the grinding of the upper and lower teeth. During sleep, the biting force of clenched jaws can be up to six times greater than during waking hours.

    Bruxism can cause complications over the years such as:
    - Wear down tooth enamel
    - Break fillings or other dental work
    - Wear down tooth enamel
    - Break fillings or other dental work
    - Worsening of TMJ dysfunction
    - Jaw pain, toothaches, headaches, or earaches
    - Tooth sensitivity and mobility
    - Erosion of gums and supporting bones

    There is no cure for Bruxism, but wearing a Nightguard can control this dysfunction.




    Back

    TMJ / TMD

    Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) generally fall into 3 main categories:
    1) Myofascial pain, the most common form of TMD, which is pain or discomfort or pain in the muscles that control jaw function and the neck and shoulder muscles.
    2) Internal derangement of the joint, meaning a dislocated jaw or displaced disc, or injury to the condyle.
    3) Degenerative joint disease, such as Osteoarthritis or Rheumatoid Arthritis in the jaw joint.

    A person can have one or more of these symptoms at the same time. Symptoms of a TMJ Disorder include:
    - Limited movement or locking of the jaw
    - Radiating pain in the face, neck or shoulders
    - Painful clicking, popping or grating sounds in the jaw joint when opening or closing the mouth
    - A sudden, major change in the way the upper and lower teeth fit together
    - Headaches, earaches, dizziness, and hearing problems




    Back

    Headaches

    Headaches

    If you suffer from frequent head or facial pain, an incorrect bite may be the cause due to constant cranial muscle strain. Headaches from dental stress are a type of muscle tension headache. A tension headache may be on one or both sides of your head and feels like a dull, non-throbbing ache that can usually be relieved by aspirin.

    When you swallow, your upper and lower jaw muscles must hold your jaw firmly against the skull. Between swallowing over 2,000 times a day and a poorly aligned bite, the jaw muscles can overwork causing muscle strain which in turn leads to a headache. People who suffer from migraine pain and chronic headaches clench their jaws in a balanced, centered position. This causes extremely intense muscular contraction, but little strain on the jaw. Nighttime jaw clenching usually goes unnoticed but it sets the stage for migraine pain and chronic headaches.





    Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function googleAnalyticsGetImageUrl() in /home/coronado/public_html/mobile/services.php:151 Stack trace: #0 {main} thrown in /home/coronado/public_html/mobile/services.php on line 151